How Do They See Us from Afar: British Scholars and Romanesque and Gothic Architecture in Lesser Poland

Tomasz Węcławowicz

Abstrakt

Romanesque and Gothic architecture in Poland cannot compete with European medieval masterpieces even though before the 15th century, medieval buildings in the Kingdom were created by foreign mastermasons who came from far afield. Until recently, Gothic and especially Romanesque churches did not attract attention of British scholars. It is now rewarding for the Polish reader, that thanks to Paul Crossley, Alexandra Gajewski, Zoë Opačić, Agnieszka Sadraei and primarily Eric Fernie, Polish medieval architecture appears for the first time in international literature. Encouragingly, even if it has been created on the outskirts of the Latin culture, it is now seen as being closely anchored in the  European artistic universum of that time.

Słowa kluczowe: Lesser Poland, Medieval architecture, British scholars
References

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